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Wine

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Grape varieties in Spain

Grape varieties in Spain

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White wines of Spain

White wines of Spain

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The red wines of Spain

The red wines of Spain

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Rose Wines of Spain

Rose Wines of Spain

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Spanish champagne

Spanish champagne

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Wine cellars of Spain

Wine cellars of Spain

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Wine is, without exaggeration, is the basic element of all and each of the regional cuisines Spain . Spain , along with France and Italy, three of the largest wine producers in the world, the country has a wide variety of excellent wines that are made in 57 different areas. Some of them - certainly exceptional quality.

Spanish wines is very good indeed, some of the best in the world. And they are getting better. 80th was a serious test for Spanish wines. Spain's entry into the EEC opened up a vast new market. In addition, today and in the Spain and abroad , wine connoisseurs have become more sophisticated, the focus as placed on more than quantity.

This encouraged prudent wine companies to explore new techniques and experimenting with a wide variety of wines. Be drivers increasing number of imported varieties. Produced more wine made from a single grape variety. More brands appear in stores, new areas of Spain offer in the market of wine. The variety of Spanish wines has become much more than than just a few years ago. And, of course, the increase in prices. Nr price-quality ratio of Spanish is still out of reach.

Each year, Spain is producing more interesting and quality wines, surpassing even the most optimistic forecasts. Of high-quality varieties of the local Spanish Tempranillo is considered only; besides some areas of Rioja, Penedes, and Ribera del Duero in Spain does not land a world-class, however, the number of truly fine Spanish wines continues to grow, both in the lower and in the highest category.

Most vineyards does ne lack the capacity, otherwise we would not have seen the current revolution in the Spanish wine industry. Even 20 years ago, the majority of Spanish wines, with the exception of Rioja wines were either oxidized or contain an excess of sulfur. No country with a long, deep-rooted tradition of winemaking has not sought such a quick and lasting success as Spain.